8 Common Misconceptions About the Bloodborne Pathogens Standard Debunked

Jan 18, 24 8 Common Misconceptions About the Bloodborne Pathogens Standard Debunked

Posted by in Suture Needle

The OSHA Bloodborne Pathogens standard aims to limit your occupational exposure as a healthcare worker to contaminated blood and bodily fluids. However, decades after its introduction, you may still need to understand some essential requirements. This debunks eight common misconceptions surrounding the Bloodborne Pathogens Standard from your perspective as a healthcare professional. Misconception #1: Who Benefits: The standard protects all of you with reasonably anticipated exposure risks. This includes physicians, technicians, janitors and other support staff who may come into contact with hazards. Misconception #2: Vaccines Compliance Requirements: While hepatitis B vaccination is mandated, you must follow all other exposure control provisions even if vaccinated. For example, you would still need to use personal protective equipment. Misconception #3: Training: You need bloodborne pathogens training when hired, whenever your duties change and following any exposure incidents. Annual refreshers are also required to maintain compliance. Misconception #4: Written Plans Required for Dentistry: All covered employers, including dentists, must maintain an exposure control plan outlining their protective policies and post-exposure procedures. Misconception #5: Offsite Services: Home healthcare, medical transport, and other offsite services still need to assess exposure risks and implement appropriate controls. If you work in mobile services, safety precautions are still essential. Misconception #6: Compliance Records: Your medical records, training documents and exposure plans must be retained for the duration of employment plus 30 years. Proper record storage protocols should be followed. Misconception #7: Exposure Incidents: Needle sticks happen more often than you may realize. You need to report quickly and follow up on any potential exposures. Sharp injury logs must be maintained. Misconception #8: Blood Testing After Exposure: While recommended, post-exposure blood testing of sources requires informed consent. Your testing after exposure is also voluntary unless state law mandates it. But counselling should still be provided. Accurate knowledge regarding this complex standard allows you and your healthcare leaders to create safer workplaces and protect personnel and patients from infection transmission. Ongoing training to clarify these common misconceptions is...

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Finding the Best Solutions for Sharps Safety

Jan 13, 23 Finding the Best Solutions for Sharps Safety

Posted by in Suture Needle

You accept specific risks associated with your procedures every time you enter the operating room. While many of these risks belong to the patient, others can impact you and your surgical team. Sharps safety is one of the most crucial elements of keeping everyone healthy, including the medical team. The following products can improve safety levels. Robotic and Laparoscopic Closure Systems The most dangerous time of any operation is during closure. As you place sutures, needles are often passed back and forth, amplifying the risk of accidental needle sticks. You can eliminate the back and forth during robotic and laparoscopic procedures and ensure sharps safety. Closure systems offer fast, simple delivery and require minimal insertion depth to provide accurate closures that heal well. These closure systems minimize needle handling and protect the surgeon and the support team. Needle Traps Needle traps safely and securely store suture needles during the procedure to ensure easy access and reduce the need to pass needles back and forth. One side of the traps contains new needles, pre-threaded for each suture. After using the needle, the other side of the trap consists of a disposal unit that secures used needles while keeping them out of the way. These traps can mount to the surgical drape, a wrist strap, or a barrier kit. Barrier Kits Barrier kits are a sharps safety device designed to be worn by the surgeon to provide easy access to suture needles. These kits include a needle trap with ergonomic positioning to streamline the closure process. The scrub tech no longer has to worry about passing new needles to the surgeon, receiving used needles, and completing a needle count at the end of the procedure. If you’re interested in products to increase sharps safety, visit Sharp Fluidics...

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