Ignoring Sleep Apnea Can Lead to Dangerous Consequences

Jul 11, 19 Ignoring Sleep Apnea Can Lead to Dangerous Consequences

More than 22 million people in North America suffer from sleep apnea. The experience can range from an irritating nuisance to an event that can produce major health problems. But did you know that obstructive sleep apnea can kill you?

It can. In fact, the famous Star Wars actress as a result of sleep apnea. It exacerbated an underlying heart condition and other health problems that had plagued her during her 60 years. Her case shows that, especially for people with health issues that weaken them overall, sleep apnea can become the trigger that will cause death.

The American Sleep Apnea Association reports that an estimated 38,000 people per year die as a result of obstructive sleep apnea.

To be sure, if you are suffering from this common sleep disorder, your chances of dying from it are still relatively small. But even if it doesn’t kill you, the disruption of proper oxygen delivery to your brain as you sleep at night can produce a host of problems. One of the most common is waking up feeling exhausted and tired all day. When you are robbed of a good night’s sleep, it ruins the hours of your waking life.

For residents of British Columbia who suspect they are suffering from this condition, seeking help might begin with an internet search on obstructive sleep apnea in Burnaby.

That will put you in touch with specialists who have an array of treatments that can greatly relieve sleep apnea. One is called CPAP. This stands for Continuous Positive Airway Pressure. This involves using a device that applies continuous mild air pressure that will keep airways open while you sleep.

Your obstructive sleep apnea in Burnaby search can be the beginning of gaining a host of positive benefits. That includes increased energy, fewer morning headaches, reduced irritability, improved memory, increased effectiveness at work, sounder, more blissful sleep at night, and decreased risk of danger to the heart.

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